(via fitachious)





mrsjonie:




Tips for Relieving Muscle Soreness: You’ve felt it before and, if you’re doing things right, you’ll feel it again. Yes, of course, there’s that too … but what we’re actually referring to here is muscle soreness. You know, the byproduct of a “no pain, no gain” approach to training. Assuming it isn’t actual pain, as in torn ligament/cracked bones pain, the soreness that comes after a good, hard workout is a good thing, in a sense.
It’s an indication that you did your part in nudging a muscle to repair itself to a stronger state than the one it was in before you trained it. Of course, while a little soreness won’t interfere with your day-to-day activities, there will be times when you find yourself hobbling about like Betty White, only without her bank account. And that’s not a good thing. It’s times like these when you’ll want to know the best ways to manage that pain so that you can get back in action right quick, and show Betty who’s boss.
MEET DOMS: What you’re feeling anywhere from 12-48 hours after a workout is something specialists in such matters refer to as DOMS, or Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness. It results from microscopic tears within muscle tissues, which is what you’re creating when you workout. The pain response is the body’s way of signaling to you that repair work is going on and that you’d best leave it be for a few days. Your body is smart like that, and it always lets you know when it’s time to get back to it, by way of alleviating the soreness.
Interestingly, DOMS seems to be the result of eccentric muscle contractions—as in negative reps—rather than concentric ones. However, since you can’t have a negative rep without a positive rep, you’re going to experience DOMS if you have any intention of being active in your life.
TREAT DOMS: There is no tried-and-true treatment for DOMS, but there are several steps you can take to help minimize its severity:
Ibuprofen: Low-dose, over-the-counter painkillers—and Ibuprofen in particular, which has specifically been shown to decrease muscle soreness—will help take the edge off of severe cases of DOMS.
Gentle Stretching: When muscles are in recovery mode they tend to tighten up, exacerbating feelings of soreness. Slow, gentle stretching of the area will relieve that tight feeling and diffuse the pain.
Light Massage: Massaging a sore muscle can help reduce tightness while promoting blood flow, which in turn helps speed recovery, thus shortening the duration of DOMS.
Warm Bath: As with massage, warm water will loosen up tight muscles and improve circulation. Better circulation means more oxygen- and nutrient-rich blood coming to the rescue of your aching muscles.
Hot/Cold Treatment: Apply an ice pack for 15 minutes, followed by a heat pack for another 15, and back again. Studies have shown alternating cold with hot to be highly effective in promoting both circulation and muscle recuperation.
BEAT DOMS: In short, you can’t. No one has yet figured a way to circumvent DOMS, and maybe that’s a good thing. After all, it is the body’s signal to your brain that it needs a rest. Plus, you have to admit, there’s something supremely satisfying about the feeling you get from having to walk like Betty White for a couple of days after a kick-ass leg workout.

mrsjonie:

Tips for Relieving Muscle Soreness: You’ve felt it before and, if you’re doing things right, you’ll feel it again. Yes, of course, there’s that too … but what we’re actually referring to here is muscle soreness. You know, the byproduct of a “no pain, no gain” approach to training. Assuming it isn’t actual pain, as in torn ligament/cracked bones pain, the soreness that comes after a good, hard workout is a good thing, in a sense.

It’s an indication that you did your part in nudging a muscle to repair itself to a stronger state than the one it was in before you trained it. Of course, while a little soreness won’t interfere with your day-to-day activities, there will be times when you find yourself hobbling about like Betty White, only without her bank account. And that’s not a good thing. It’s times like these when you’ll want to know the best ways to manage that pain so that you can get back in action right quick, and show Betty who’s boss.

MEET DOMS: What you’re feeling anywhere from 12-48 hours after a workout is something specialists in such matters refer to as DOMS, or Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness. It results from microscopic tears within muscle tissues, which is what you’re creating when you workout. The pain response is the body’s way of signaling to you that repair work is going on and that you’d best leave it be for a few days. Your body is smart like that, and it always lets you know when it’s time to get back to it, by way of alleviating the soreness.

Interestingly, DOMS seems to be the result of eccentric muscle contractions—as in negative reps—rather than concentric ones. However, since you can’t have a negative rep without a positive rep, you’re going to experience DOMS if you have any intention of being active in your life.

TREAT DOMS: There is no tried-and-true treatment for DOMS, but there are several steps you can take to help minimize its severity:

  • Ibuprofen: Low-dose, over-the-counter painkillers—and Ibuprofen in particular, which has specifically been shown to decrease muscle soreness—will help take the edge off of severe cases of DOMS.
  • Gentle Stretching: When muscles are in recovery mode they tend to tighten up, exacerbating feelings of soreness. Slow, gentle stretching of the area will relieve that tight feeling and diffuse the pain.
  • Light Massage: Massaging a sore muscle can help reduce tightness while promoting blood flow, which in turn helps speed recovery, thus shortening the duration of DOMS.
  • Warm Bath: As with massage, warm water will loosen up tight muscles and improve circulation. Better circulation means more oxygen- and nutrient-rich blood coming to the rescue of your aching muscles.
  • Hot/Cold Treatment: Apply an ice pack for 15 minutes, followed by a heat pack for another 15, and back again. Studies have shown alternating cold with hot to be highly effective in promoting both circulation and muscle recuperation.

BEAT DOMS: In short, you can’t. No one has yet figured a way to circumvent DOMS, and maybe that’s a good thing. After all, it is the body’s signal to your brain that it needs a rest. Plus, you have to admit, there’s something supremely satisfying about the feeling you get from having to walk like Betty White for a couple of days after a kick-ass leg workout.


slimmersummers:

fitness—health—nutrition:

6 Biggest Exercise Mistakes Nearly Everyone Makes:
1. Doing Exercise You Don’t Enjoy
I used to think that to be fit or to look a certain way I had to do this or that particular exercise. I was wrong, and my motivation suffered as a result. Working out should make you happy. You should get excited abut the thought of your workout. If you’re always dreading tomorrow’s workout, how do you expect this healthy habit to last a lifetime? Find physical activity you enjoy and love and you will never exercise a day in your life.
2. Doing Too Much Exercise
Exercise is great, so more is better – right? Wrong. I’ve tried to out-exercise a bad diet in the past and have failed miserably every time. The amount of exercise needed to “cancel” out a bad meal is enormous. In addition, it has always lead to an injury. It certainly is possible to do hours of intense exercise a day, but it’s something that has to be worked up to. For most people that want to be fit and health and look good doing it, a few intense workouts a week combined with staying active is plenty to get the job done.
3. Exercising Through Injuries
Even to this day I have a tough time with this one. I always seem to get an injury at the peek of my motivation. I don’t want to stop exercising – and I don’t. Dumb! As a result, I push through the pain and the injury never gets better. I go through the 5 stages of grief before I do the right thing – rest the injury. I know you don’t want to stop, but trust me, the longer you put off recovery of the injury, the longer you’re going to have to wait before you can go at full intensity. Nagging injuries are a pain in the butt.
4. Not Warming Up Correctly
Throughout school I was taught to warm up properly by doing static stretches. Static stretches are stretches you hold for a period of time. For example, bending over and touching your toes and holding for 10 seconds. Later in life I found out that this did little for improving muscular performance or reducing injuries. Instead, dynamic stretching is where it’s at. Dynamic stretching produces significantly greater performance when compared to static stretching protocols.
5. Thinking You Need to Separate Strength and Cardio Training
More and more people are discovering the benefits of high-intensity interval training. I used to come from a bodybuilding background where strength training and cardio were two separate workouts. This training became so popularized that people started to forget that cardio is simply cardiovascular training. Cardiovascular training can also be accomplished at the same time as strength training. You just need to push the intensity of your workouts. HIIT is a great way to do this.
6. Working Out Your Ego Instead of Your Muscles
In my younger lifting career, I wouldn’t be caught dead doing an exercise that didn’t have a significant amount of weight on the bar. I was the king of the quarter squat. But boy did my ego feel good. Unfortunately, this came at the expense of muscle growth. Today, this is still one of the biggest exercise mistakes I see in the gym. Don’t worry about what anyone else thinks. Work out with a weight that allows you to use proper form and move through the full range of motion. If you need an ego stroking, there are better ways.
Article from Coachcalorie.com

slimmersummers:

fitness—health—nutrition:

6 Biggest Exercise Mistakes Nearly Everyone Makes:

1. Doing Exercise You Don’t Enjoy

I used to think that to be fit or to look a certain way I had to do this or that particular exercise. I was wrong, and my motivation suffered as a result. Working out should make you happy. You should get excited abut the thought of your workout. If you’re always dreading tomorrow’s workout, how do you expect this healthy habit to last a lifetime? Find physical activity you enjoy and love and you will never exercise a day in your life.

2. Doing Too Much Exercise

Exercise is great, so more is better – right? Wrong. I’ve tried to out-exercise a bad diet in the past and have failed miserably every time. The amount of exercise needed to “cancel” out a bad meal is enormous. In addition, it has always lead to an injury. It certainly is possible to do hours of intense exercise a day, but it’s something that has to be worked up to. For most people that want to be fit and health and look good doing it, a few intense workouts a week combined with staying active is plenty to get the job done.

3. Exercising Through Injuries

Even to this day I have a tough time with this one. I always seem to get an injury at the peek of my motivation. I don’t want to stop exercising – and I don’t. Dumb! As a result, I push through the pain and the injury never gets better. I go through the 5 stages of grief before I do the right thing – rest the injury. I know you don’t want to stop, but trust me, the longer you put off recovery of the injury, the longer you’re going to have to wait before you can go at full intensity. Nagging injuries are a pain in the butt.

4. Not Warming Up Correctly

Throughout school I was taught to warm up properly by doing static stretches. Static stretches are stretches you hold for a period of time. For example, bending over and touching your toes and holding for 10 seconds. Later in life I found out that this did little for improving muscular performance or reducing injuries. Instead, dynamic stretching is where it’s at. Dynamic stretching produces significantly greater performance when compared to static stretching protocols.

5. Thinking You Need to Separate Strength and Cardio Training

More and more people are discovering the benefits of high-intensity interval training. I used to come from a bodybuilding background where strength training and cardio were two separate workouts. This training became so popularized that people started to forget that cardio is simply cardiovascular training. Cardiovascular training can also be accomplished at the same time as strength training. You just need to push the intensity of your workouts. HIIT is a great way to do this.

6. Working Out Your Ego Instead of Your Muscles

In my younger lifting career, I wouldn’t be caught dead doing an exercise that didn’t have a significant amount of weight on the bar. I was the king of the quarter squat. But boy did my ego feel good. Unfortunately, this came at the expense of muscle growth. Today, this is still one of the biggest exercise mistakes I see in the gym. Don’t worry about what anyone else thinks. Work out with a weight that allows you to use proper form and move through the full range of motion. If you need an ego stroking, there are better ways.

Article from Coachcalorie.com

(via get-healthy-feel-awesome)



ladyandthetrack:

My fruit brings all the fitblrs to the yard

ladyandthetrack:

My fruit brings all the fitblrs to the yard